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Events

Running the Brisbane River Loop

If you ride a bike in Brisbane, chances are you’ve ridden one of the several versions of the River Loop. Our Membership Coordinator, Amanda, decided to add running the river loop to her goals list for 2022. Her recap is below!

When I was building up my running fitness for the Sunshine Coast 70.3 in September, I decided I wanted to put it to use for at least one more long run after the event. On my regular Brisbane river loop ride, I kept seeing the same group of people running in the opposite direction in the Chelmer area. So, thanks to that group of runners wearing intraining singlets, running the shortest and least hilly version of the river loop went on my goals list for 2022.

I rode a recce of the version I had in mind, and it measured around 27km. The longest distance I had run previously was 23.5km along the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail. Running all sections of the BVRT was on last year’s list! My river loop version was only a half marathon with a park run tacked on. What could go wrong?

I planned to run the loop 2 weeks after the 70.3. Recovery wasn’t great after the event but I managed a couple of 5km runs in the lead up to the loop.

Starting at ‘Florence’ the Kombi at Southbank, I headed across the Goodwill bridge for an anti-clockwise loop. I never felt comfortable during the run. It was about 5km to the Regatta ferry terminal but it felt like 20km. I kept plodding but was dreading those hills at the Indooroopilly golf course!

I kept up the gels, Gatorade and water. By the time I got to Tennyson with about 8km to go, I started having knee issues, so I stopped and stretched. Determined not to walk, I took the shortcut to the Corso past the pink house and the AFL fields. I met up with my husband and he ran the last 6km with me. Every 500m of those last 6km I had to stop and stretch my knee. Definitely still not walking until the Kombi! I was 200m short of 27km, so naturally had to keep going to round it up.

I’m now working on my 2023 goals. Do you have anything on your list? Keep stepping outside of your comfort zone and challenging yourself!

See more about the Brisbane River Loop and other great places to ride on our Where to Ride page.

Categories
Events

Riding across Australia to break the cycle of poverty

Bicycle Queensland members Nellie and Richard Logan embarked on a bike ride of more than 4000km over 28 days, to help raise funds for children facing poverty. Read the recount of their amazing journey below:

On 17th September 2022, Richard and I headed out with a team of 22 cyclists and 15 support crew from Cottesloe Beach, Perth to begin a 28-day ride across Australia. Our final destination was Bar Beach in Newcastle NSW, 4200km away and our goal was to raise $1 million for Compassion’s Critical Needs Fund and see 150 children sponsored.

We were an odd assortment of riders from all over the country, some had done this ride previously and others had never ridden in a group. A few cyclists used to race in their younger days, one even at an elite level. One man had ridden across a few continents. Then some had never done a multi-day ride before training for this event. Our backgrounds varied from businesspeople to teachers to physios to working in IT, we were a mix of ages and sizes.

Team riding

The accommodation was also a bit of a mix. We would find ourselves in caravan park cabins, or roadhouse motels (sometimes squished in because there weren’t enough rooms to accommodate us). Many times we would be bunking down together in church halls or sports centres. Occasionally we got billeted out to locals. We stayed in a few delightful old buildings, such as the Catholic Convent in Coolgardie, a beautiful 120-year-old plus property in Muswellbrook, and the town hall at Burra that is now a museum.

There were many tests along the way, headwinds of 30kph, crosswinds up to 50kph, sickness, rain and rain mixed with coal dust (we were filthy dirty that day). Even icy winds coming straight off the Southern Ocean. There were long days in the saddle, sometimes arriving just as the sun set. We dodged kangaroos, emus, and snakes on the roads, we came across the occasional cranky truckie who would decide to pull in a little too soon after overtaking. There were plenty of highlights, seeing the beautiful landscapes, like the green rolling hills near Burra, meeting the townsfolk who would openly welcome us and feed us.

Each morning Richard would give us the numbers for the day, distances to each stop and the elevation report. We’d also get a weather report and a reading of a child story. These child stories would tell us of the hardships faced by children living in poverty and how Compassion has made a difference in their lives. These child stories were powerful reminders to us of why we were riding.

Riding along the highways and through the towns sparked plenty of interest. Truckies would honk in encouragement, some would even ask how to donate. Caravanners would come and visit us in the evenings, telling us they had passed us along the way and would then give us a donation to the cause. Sometimes people would even pull up on the side of the road to pass on a donation. Richard had a local come and chat with him one lunchtime. The guy told him not to leave town just yet, the fellow took off and came back 10 minutes later with some cash in his hand. In Port Pirie, the local bakery donated pallets of bread and donuts to the team after one of the team members popped in for a pie and told them what we were up to. We were overwhelmed by the generosity of people and their kind hearts.

We met plenty of characters along the way. 10-year-old Ethan from Minnipa was quite enamoured with what we were doing, he rocked up on his bike the morning we were leaving Minnipa. One of the team gave him their jersey, Ethan put on his new jersey, jumped on his bike, and led us out of Minnipa, despite the rain. We later heard from his Mum that Ethan had been saving for a phone but he would now like to donate his savings to the children of Compassion.

Then there was 84-year-old Doris. We met Doris in Parkes at a church meeting, and she also came down to see us off. Doris was on her red push bike, and once again led the team out!

Ethan
Doris

One of the most heartfelt was meeting Linda from Kenya. She told us that her brother had been sponsored through Compassion and proceeded to tell us how it had made a difference to her brother and their family. We also found out that this woman was born in the same town as one of our support crew. Wow, to hear first-hand the work of Compassion.

Our last days were our biggest in elevation and some of our longest in kilometres. We had to cross the range to reach the coast, and what a welcome we received as we road into Bar Beach! The footpath was full of friends and family and all the Compassion Staff from all over the country, there to greet us and cheer us in. It was a very emotional moment. We had done it, we had made the journey across Australia. We fostered awareness of the great work Compassion does in developing nations, and we had raised much-needed funds for children living in poverty. We aim to reach $1 million, the current tally is almost $950,000.

Thank you Bicycle Queensland and members for your support.

Nellie and Richard are keen to reach their target by the end of 2022. To help break the cycle of poverty you can sponsor a child or donate to Compassion’s Critical Needs Fund.

If you’d like to become a member and help support more people riding more often, join us here.

Nellie and Richard
Burra Town Hall
Categories
Advocacy Uncategorised

E-bikes Should Be Included In The National EV Strategy

Bicycle Queensland says the Federal Government is missing a major opportunity to create real change in the move towards electric vehicles.

BQ has joined with all the major bicycle advocacy groups in a submission to the Federal Government’s National Electric Vehicle strategy.

The group has called for the Strategy to recognise the potential for e-bikes and other light electric vehicles to contribute to the goals of the National EV Strategy.

E-bikes and micro-mobility are increasingly popular as car replacements for daily commuting trips, they address the cost-of-living crisis through significantly lower acquisition and running costs than EVs, they are viable for the short transport trips that make up half of all trips each day in Australia and their use contributes to health, environmental and community benefits.

But at the moment, e-bikes are not included in the National Strategy.

View our joint submission here.

Graphic from the Institute for Sensible Transport
Categories
Events

IRONMAN 70.3 Sunshine Coast

Our very own Amanda Hernandez, Membership Coordinator completed the IRONMAN 70.3 Sunshine Coast on 11 September 2022. A swim that started on the beautiful Mooloolaba Beach, followed by a fast and furious ride and a picture-perfect two-lap coastal run. What an amazing effort, below you can read Amanda’s recount of the day.

Last year I rode the bike leg of the IRONMAN Sunshine Coast 70.3, and I thought anyone who runs a half marathon after riding 90km had to be crazy. Then I thought, I wonder if I could do it? I had run a few half marathon distances on road and gravel. Next minute, it was on my goals list for 2022! I needed a swimmer and luckily I knew a good one who kindly stepped up. Learning how to swim is also on my goals list for this year!

I knew nothing about how to train. I didn’t understand the training plans, they were all about the length of time and effort. I normally work on distance, and go as fast or as slow as I feel like on the day. I asked a few people who had done Ironman events for advice and devised a plan. I started using gels and Gatorade, a change from post-ride hot chocolates and pastries. Most of my training was done solo, and with early winter starts, it was tough.

While I’m a confident rider, my main concern was not being able to fix a flat, and not making it to the run leg. I knew the steps involved, but my hands are not overly strong or dexterous, and I’ve always needed help to get a tyre off and on the rim. I didn’t know how to take the rear wheel off a bike – also on my goals list! A week before the event, I managed to take the rear wheel off and put it on. Once you understand the mechanics, there’s no turning back. Three nights before the event, for the first time, I installed new tubes and tyres, front and rear, all by myself with supervision and coaching from my bike handler.

Race day nerves weren’t present, because I was a little stressed about my delay in arriving at transition. I had to pump my tyres and unpack my gear bag before transition closed. Then, I lost my swimmer after dropping off the pump – so many wetsuits, everyone looked the same, and I didn’t have my glasses. Off to the beach I went to wait for the start and hoped to see her run into the water. Once I thought I saw her I went back to transition to prepare for the ride. The bike leg went well although I rationed my fluids too much. I hit the same small patch of glass and pothole on each lap, at least I was consistent! I couldn’t stomach a gel until I was 12km into the run leg, and that was the only one. The rest of the leg was done on water and Gatorade. I need to work on different nutrition for the next 70.3.

That’s right, the next one. There will be another 70.3 on my goals for next year. Challenge yourself and step outside of your comfort zone. You will learn and grow.

Categories
Education Partner News

White Cloud Foundation Partnership

Bicycle Queensland would like to announce an exciting new partnership with White Cloud Foundation. White Cloud is a charity organisation that provides free tele-mental health services to Queenslanders struggling with anxiety and depression. White Cloud also provide an incredible meals for mums service which support women at risk of or experiencing perinatal depression.

This partnership enables Bicycle Queensland members to access support without a diagnosis, no referral, and at no cost. White Cloud’s services include mental health nursing and counselling, psychology, social work, dietitians, and exercise physiology.

White Cloud was created to remove the barriers to accessing mental health treatment, identifying that getting access to early support when you have the speed wobbles is incredibly important.

BQ CEO Rebecca Randazzo said, “We know that some of the reasons why we ride a bike is for that social connection and wellbeing and we are really excited to partner with White Cloud and bring about great outcomes for our members”.

If you need support, you can access White Clouds service by calling 07 3155 3456

Find out more about White Cloud

Adam Scott Chair of WCF with BQ CEO Rebecca Randazzo
Categories
Events

Annual General Meeting Results

The Bicycle Queensland (BQ) board and members gathered online on September 22 for the Annual General meeting. The Annual report can be accessed here.

BQ welcomes Richard Buning to the board. Richard has a love for all things cycling. He brings a wealth of experience and expertise both as a bike rider and academic expert in active lifestyle. In his role as a Senior Lecturer at the University of Queensland Business school, his research interests reside at the intersection of physical activity, travel, and events. Outside of work, Richard can be found pursuing his passions of mountain biking, running, rock climbing, and hiking. 

The board thanks departing directors, Rob van Manen, Audine Bartlett, and Craig Davis for their years of service to BQ. The board wishes to acknowledge the leadership, care, and commitment of Rob van Manen who has served as a management committee member, President, and Chair of BQ over the past four and half years.

Categories
Advocacy Uncategorised

Bridges section of Boyne-Burnett Inland Rail Trail opens

Opening of the Mt Debatebale to Mundubbera rail trail.

The Boyne-Burnett Inland Rail Trail (BBIRT) is a great success story of grassroots actions by communities a long way away from the seat of power. Last weekend a second section was officially opened, 30km of trail from Mt Debateable to Mundubbera.

This is the “Bridges” section of the BBIRT, as the rail corridor runs beside the mighty Burnett River, and crosses the many creeks feeding the river as they run off Mt Gayndah and the Binjour Plateau. The bridges which cross these creeks are listed by Engineers Australia as being of heritage significance.

Unfortunately floods have seen off two of these bridges, Reid Creek and Philpott, making it difficult for the rail trail to run along the corridor the entire distance from Gayndah to Mundubbera. At present, the trail starts 10km out of town in Mt Debateable siding, as the Reid Creek crossing prevents the trail from connecting into Gayndah. However, there is a detour around the site, where the bridge across Philpott Creek once was, adding a few kilometres to the journey.

Like many Queensland rail trails, this is an adventure experience. There are sandy sections, bumpy sections, and a few steep pinches out of gullies. The trail is best suited to a mountain bike (e-mtb is becoming popular too).

But for the adventurous who attempt the Bridges section of the BBIRT, you are rewarded with great views, and several plaques marking historical sites of interest.

Packs and Pedals’ runs a shuttle service on the BBIRT, and they can help you explore either the Bridges section or the Tunnels section from Kalpowar to Ubobo in the Boyne Valley.

Categories
Education

Riding across the country to break the cycle of poverty

Imagine cycling from one side of Australia to the other! Bicycle Queensland members Nellie and Richard Logan will be riding more than 4000km over 28 days, on September 17 this year. They will help raise funds for children facing poverty. 

The pair will be accompanied by 25 other riders starting in Cottesloe Beach Perth, WA, and will ride across the country to Newcastle, NSW. The team will ride an average of 160km daily with their biggest day just under 200km! The average cyclists normally ride between 40-60km a couple of days per week, followed by a 70-100km ride on the weekend. 

“This upcoming ride is going to test us mentally, physically, and emotionally. We will be stretched beyond our limits,” says Richard and Nellie Logan.

The team will be riding through all kinds of weather, across the harsh Australian outback. The terrain will vary from flat and hilly to mountainous. There will be a support team to ensure the group remains safe on the roads, well-fed and hydrated. 

We are so proud that Nellie and Richard are embarking on this journey. They will be raising funds for highly vulnerable children living in poverty. Richard and Nellie, along with their team, aim to raise $1 million in funds. This money will be used to support vulnerable children in Compassion’s programs who have been severely impacted by COVID-19 and now are suffering under the current global food crisis. This is such a powerful opportunity to make a difference.

To help break the cycle of poverty you can sponsor a child or donate to Compassion’s Critical Needs Fund.

If you’re looking to become a BQ member like Richard and Nellie, join us this September and receive 35% off!